Inducing Political Attitude Change and Shifted Voting Intentions During a General Election

Thomas StrandbergLund University Cognitive Science
Lars HallLund University Cognitive Science
Petter JohanssonSwedish Collegium for Advanced Study

Abstract

Do voters really hold their political attitudes so firmly that they are unreceptive to persuasion? We asked our participants to state their voter intention, and presented them with a political survey of wedge issues between the two coalitions. Using a sleight-of-hand we then altered their replies to place them in the opposite political camp, and invited them to reason about their attitudes on the manipulated issues. Finally, we summarized their survey score, and asked for their voter intention again. The results showed that no more than 22% of the manipulated replies were detected, and that a full 92% of the participants accepted and endorsed our altered political survey score. Furthermore, the final voter intention question indicated that as many as 48% were willing to consider a left-right coalition shift. This can be contrasted with the established polls tracking the Swedish election, which registered maximally 10% voters open for a swing.

Files

Inducing Political Attitude Change and Shifted Voting Intentions During a General Election (1 KB)



Back to Table of Contents