The Cognitive Reflection Test, Numeracy and Decision-making Tasks: A Study in Taiwan

Joseph LavalleeMing Chuan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Supin HungNational Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan

Abstract

Despite its widespread use, disagreement remains about whether the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) measures the ability to inhibit an intuitively appealing but incorrect response to a problem, or simply numeracy skills. We administered Chinese-language versions of the extended seven-item CRT, two widely-used numeracy scales and a set of decision-making tasks (risk preferences, ratio bias and framing) to 186 students at a university in Taiwan. Higher levels of parental education significantly predicted higher CRT scores (p < .001) but not higher numeracy scores; males outperformed females on both, but differences were not significant. In contrast to earlier studies, no pattern of significant relations between CRT, numeracy and risk preferences emerged. Higher numeracy – but not CRT – scores were associated with better choices on the ratio bias task. Higher numeracy – but not CRT scores – were associated with lower susceptibility to framing, but differences did not reach significance. Overall, results suggest two distinct constructs.

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