Stimulus identity differentially influences the perception of space and time

Devin GillIllinois State University
J. Scott JordanIllinois State University

Abstract

Previous data indicate that individuals who continuously track a stimulus that suddenly vanishes indicate a vanishing point further ahead from where the stimulus actually vanished in the direction of momentum (Hubbard, 1995b). Implied forces (e.g., friction; Hubbard, 1995b) and typical motion (Reed & Vinson, 1996) have been shown to affect the perceptual planning associated with tracking a stimulus. Participants controlled an arbitrary stimulus (i.e., a bullet-train vs. a house) in two implied friction contexts (i.e., no surface and surface below), indicated the vanishing point of the stimulus, and made estimates of trials times after every trial. There was a main effect of friction on spatial displacement but not on time. Concepts, however, influence the perception of space and time differently. Participants controlling a bullet-train indicated less time per trial than participants controlling a house. This finding is further verified by no differences between concepts in actual trial times.

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