Implicit Priming Paradigm Reveals the Embodied and Situated Aspects of Imaged Feeling

Sau-chin ChenDepartment of Human Development, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan
Jon-fan HuDepartment of Psychology, National Cheng-Kung University
Wei-yang XuDepartment of Human Development, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan
Yen-Chneg ChenDepartment of Psychology, National Cheng-Kung University
Yu-Chi HuangDepartment of Psychology, National Cheng-Kung University

Abstract

To establish the implicit associations of stimulus-response connection in a word color discrimination task, the participants have to learn the patterns of actions and feel the weights of pictoral objects through successive trials of vertifying the statements in the sentences or pictures. Two particular response keys were arranged to represent the actions and the word colors respectively, and the objects having different weight values associate the specific actions. The crtical words in the word-color discrimination task are related to the feeling of weights from the imagined actions given by the experimental instruction. Praticipants¡¦ mission of Experiment 1 was to imagine that they move objects up-staris or down-stairs, and the mission of Experiment 2 was to imagine that they exchange objects with others. The stimulus-response compatibility effects in Experiment 1 were found related to the directions of actions, and the effects in Experiment 2 were constrained by the feeling of weight after imagining the actions. The overall findings show that the patterns of moving objects could shape the comprehension of imagined situation differently. We suggest a hypothetical ¡§situation modular¡¨ in the information processing model of stimulus-response compatibility for the function of creating embodied representations that participants can use to acquire the implicit associations among concepts.

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