Task relevance moderates saccade velocities to spatially separated cues

Caitlyn McColemanSimon Fraser University
Mark BlairSimon Fraser University SFU

Abstract

The study of eye movements has enjoyed a history of supporting theories of attention in different task settings by expanding our understanding of how people navigate tasks such as natural scene perception, reading and categorization. The theories and models that these data inform, however, are largely based on fixation patterns. Presently lacking is an understanding of how the eye movements preceding these fixations are affected by the task environment and if they change as a function of a shift in the state of knowledge. In an effort to close this gap, we report changing saccade velocities in two category learning experiments, evidencing the importance of understanding saccades in developing a stronger theory of the deployment of visual attention as it is influenced by higher level cognitive changes.

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Task relevance moderates saccade velocities to spatially separated cues (375 KB)



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