The role of modality congruence in the presentation and recognition of task-irrelevant stimuli in dual task paradigms.

Maegen WalkerUniversity of Hawai'i at Manoa
Andrew DewaldUniversity of Hawai'i at Manoa
Scott SinnettUniversity of Hawai'i at Manoa

Abstract

Explicitly presented task-irrelevant targets are facilitated in a later recognition test, provided they frequently appear synchronously with targets from a previously presented relevant task (Dewald & Sinnett, 2013). This dual task paradigm was used to test the relationship between the modality of which a primary task was presented, and the modality of a subsequently presented secondary task. Earlier findings suggest that cross-modal presentations lead to higher facilitation rates for items that were previously aligned with auditory targets when compared with only unimodal (auditory or visual) presentations. The current study extends these findings to conditions where the primary task is presented visually, while testing later word recognition in either the same (visual), different (auditory), or across (audiovisual) modalities. Overall, target-aligned information was recognized at significantly higher rates than non-aligned information for all three recognition tests. Critically, when comparing the magnitude of facilitation, cross-modal presentation resulted in the highest degree of facilitation.

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The role of modality congruence in the presentation and recognition of task-irrelevant stimuli in dual task paradigms. (621 KB)



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