Selective Sustained Attention, the Visual Environment, and Learning in Kindergarten-age Children: Preliminary Results of an Individual Difference Study

Karrie GodwinCarnegie Mellon University
Anna FisherCarnegie Mellon University

Abstract

Prior work has found that selective sustained attention (SSA) is related to young children’s task performance and to various indices of academic achievement (e.g., course grades, standardized test scores). However, experimental research demonstrating a link between learning and SSA is lacking. Additionally, much of the existing work is not able to partial out variance in children’s learning performance due to individual difference factors. This work examines the putative relationship between SSA, measured as the proportion of time spent off-task, and young children’s learning outcomes by yoking measures of time off-task to immediate measures of learning, while controlling for the variance in children’s learning performance due to individual difference factors such as IQ, working memory, processing speed, and inhibitory control.

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Selective Sustained Attention, the Visual Environment, and Learning in Kindergarten-age Children: Preliminary Results of an Individual Difference Study (1.1 MB)



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