Effect of Naming on Haptic Memory in Children and Adults

Trevor CessnaUniversity of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Shealan McAlisterUniversity of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Heidi KloosUniversity of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Robert FrankOhio University, Athens, Ohio, USA

Abstract

Recollection of events can be improved with the use of active strategies. In the current study, we examined if naming could serve as a mnemonic device for both children and adults to remember shapes that they explored haptically. Participants either named the shape during the encoding phase (naming condition), or they determined the “likability” of the shape (liking condition). During the retrieval phase, participants had to trace shapes again. Here, the task was to name each shape and to determine whether they remember tracing it previously. Results showed that memory performance was significantly better for adults than for children. More importantly, while there was no difference in memory performance between conditions, naming consistency was found to be the best individual predictor of correct recognition memory performance. Findings are discussed in the context of the developmental similarity and differences between haptic and olfactory memory.

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