Origins of time: New insights into the psychological foundations of time

Katharine TillmanUniversity of California, San Diego, USA
Esther WalkerUniversity of California, San Diego, USA
Tyler MarghetisUniversity of California, San Diego, USA
Andrea Bender & Sieghard BellerUniversity of Bergen, Norway
Mahesh SrinivasanUniversity of California, Berkeley, USA
David BarnerUniversity of California, San Diego, USA
Julio SantiagoUniversity of Granada, Spain
Benjamin Bergen & Rafael NunezUniversity of California, San Diego, USA
Daniel CasasantoUniversity of Chicago, USA
Lera BoroditskyUniversity of California, San Diego, USA

Abstract

What are the origins of our ability to perceive and reason about time? The human experience of time is multifaceted: duration perception on the order of seconds; words (e.g. “hour”) and grammatical features (e.g. tense) that encode specific aspects of temporal experience; reasoning about duration, sequences, and causality. While some of these abilities are present early in development, others do not emerge for many years. There is an active debate about the origins of these varied facets of temporal cognition. For instance, what are their evolutionary and developmental sources? Do certain temporal capacities distinguish us from non-human animals? Is our understanding of time built on a spatial foundation, or do both space and time rely on a shared, domain-general representational system? The time is ripe for an integrated approach to this foundational human capacity. This symposium brings together researchers whose work has presented varied perspectives on the psychological origins of time, from perception to conceptualization.

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Origins of time: New insights into the psychological foundations of time (151 KB)



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