Asymmetricity of McGurk Effect Depending on the Orientation of Faces

Abstract

We examined whether the McGurk effect depends on speaker’s facial orientation. Speakers’ vocalizing scenes of, /ba/, /da/, and /ga/ were videotaped in two angles from the left and the right. A voice and a face were congruently or incongruently combined. The experimental stimuli were edited to produce normal and mirror-inverted versions of each audio-visual pair. Participants were asked to report the syllable as they heard by free description. The result replicated the McGurk effect. The error rates were higher for the mirror-inverted right-looking faces (seen as left-looking) than for the mirror-inverted left-looking faces (seen as right-looking). And the error rates were higher for the mirror-inverted right-looking faces (seen as left-looking) than for the normal right-looking faces. These results suggest that left-looking faces enhance the McGurk effect, while differences in physical movements of the left and right sides of speaker’s mouth could be also relevant.


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